The gentlemen`s agreement of 1907 () was an informal agreement between the United States of America and the Empire of Japan紳協 which did not allow Japanese immigration and Japan to no longer emigrate to the United States. The aim was to ease tensions between the two Pacific states. The agreement was never ratified by the U.S. Congress and was replaced by the Immigration Act of 1924. The increase in Japanese immigration, which was to replace some marginalized Chinese agricultural workers, has met with concerted opposition in California. To appease Californians and avoid an open break with Japan`s emerging world power, President Theodore Roosevelt negotiated the diplomatic agreement in which the Japanese government took on the responsibility of drastically limiting Japanese immigration, especially that of workers, so that Japanese children could continue to attend integrated schools on the West Coast. However, family migration could continue, as Japanese men, with sufficient savings, could bring wives through arranged marriages („pictured wives“), their parents and minor children. As a result, the Japanese-American population was more gender-friendly than other Asian-American communities, and continued to grow through natural increases, which led to increased pressure to end immigration and further reduce residents` rights. The agreement stipulated that Japanese immigrants who were already in the United States could bring their wives, parents or children from Japan to the United States. This provision allowed Japanese men in the United States to marry a partner in Japan and then take them to the United States. As a result, the population of Japanese immigrants in California continued to increase.

Finally, the U.S. Congress passed the Immigration Act of 1924. This law prohibits Asians from traveling to the United States of America. Japan has agreed to limit the number of passports it has provided to workers and domestic workers to 400 per year. Four classes of immigrants would still be allowed to enter Canada: returning residents and their wives, children and parents; Immigrants employed by Japanese residents in Canada for personal and domestic services; Canadian government-approved workers; and contracted farm labour by Japanese landowners in Canada. Although no specific legislation has been adopted to enforce the quota, the agreement has resulted in a significant reduction in Japanese immigration.